The Ancient World

Calliope, Muse of Epic Poetry, 2nd century, Roman copy from a Greek original
The Hermitage Museum

Calliope, Muse of Epic Poetry, 2nd century, Roman copy from a Greek original

The Hermitage Museum

Clio, Muse of History, 2nd century, Roman copy from a Greek original
The Hermitage Museum

Clio, Muse of History, 2nd century, Roman copy from a Greek original

The Hermitage Museum

Amphora: Flight of Iphigenia, Orestes and Pylades from the Temple of Artemis of Taurida, 330-320 BCE, 	  				  			 					 			 			The Ixion Painter, Southern Italy
The Hermitage Museum

Amphora: Flight of Iphigenia, Orestes and Pylades from the Temple of Artemis of Taurida, 330-320 BCE, The Ixion Painter, Southern Italy

The Hermitage Museum

Pair of Earrings with a Disc and a Pyramid, 330-300s BCE
The Hermitage Museum

Pair of Earrings with a Disc and a Pyramid, 330-300s BCE

The Hermitage Museum

Apollo, 2nd century, Roman copy from a Greek original
The Hermitage Museum

Apollo, 2nd century, Roman copy from a Greek original

The Hermitage Museum

Stele of the Royal Scribe Ipi
Mid-14th century BC
Limestone, mineral paint                                                                             H 95, w 71 cm
The Hermitage Museum
"The stele is fashioned in the form of a false door                                                                  and clearly came from the tomb of Ipi at Saggara.                                                                  The depiction reveals the influence of Amarna                                                                  art. Almost the whole surface of the stele is                                                                  taken up by a scene in which Ipi, a royal scribe,                                                                  worships the God Anubis. Anubis, shown with                                                                  a canine head, was god of the deceased; he is                                                                  seated on his throne holding a sign of life. Ipi                                                                  wears a complex official robe. In front of Anubis                                                                  are two lotus buds and an altar with a vessel for                                                                  ritual libation. The inscriptions on the stele                                                                  include funeral formulae, and the names and                                                                  titles of the deceased."

Stele of the Royal Scribe Ipi

Mid-14th century BC

Limestone, mineral paint H 95, w 71 cm

The Hermitage Museum

"The stele is fashioned in the form of a false door and clearly came from the tomb of Ipi at Saggara. The depiction reveals the influence of Amarna art. Almost the whole surface of the stele is taken up by a scene in which Ipi, a royal scribe, worships the God Anubis. Anubis, shown with a canine head, was god of the deceased; he is seated on his throne holding a sign of life. Ipi wears a complex official robe. In front of Anubis are two lotus buds and an altar with a vessel for ritual libation. The inscriptions on the stele include funeral formulae, and the names and titles of the deceased."

Lekythos in the Form of Sphinx
Late 5th century BC
Attica
Clay; h 21.5 cm
The Hermitage Museum
This vessel for perfumed oil, of Attic work, was found not far from Taman in 1869. This superb example of Greek art demonstrates a notable characteristic of art of the Classical period: the form of the rim, neck and handle is that of a lekythos, while the body is executed in the form of a Sphinx – a mythological creature with a lion’s body, bird’s wings, and a woman’s head, with fine facial features and a magnificent head of curly hair.

Lekythos in the Form of Sphinx

Late 5th century BC

Attica

Clay; h 21.5 cm

The Hermitage Museum

This vessel for perfumed oil, of Attic work, was found not far from Taman in 1869. This superb example of Greek art demonstrates a notable characteristic of art of the Classical period: the form of the rim, neck and handle is that of a lekythos, while the body is executed in the form of a Sphinx – a mythological creature with a lion’s body, bird’s wings, and a woman’s head, with fine facial features and a magnificent head of curly hair.

Pair of Earrings with a Disc and a Crescent-Shaped Pendant, 330-300s BCE
The Hermitage Museum

Pair of Earrings with a Disc and a Crescent-Shaped Pendant, 330-300s BCE

The Hermitage Museum

Necklace Decorated with a Herakles Knot, 300-280 BCE, 	  				  			 					 			 			Crimea
The Hermitage Museum

Necklace Decorated with a Herakles Knot, 300-280 BCE, Crimea

The Hermitage Museum

Aphrodite (Venus of Taurida ), 2nd century BCE, Ancient Greece
The Hermitage Museum

Aphrodite (Venus of Taurida ), 2nd century BCE, Ancient Greece

The Hermitage Museum