The Ancient World

ancientart:

"They take first a crooked piece of iron, and with it draw out the brain through the nostrils, thus getting rid of a portion, while the skull is cleared of the rest by rinsing with drugs; next they make a cut along the flank with a sharp Ethiopian stone, and take out the whole contents of the abdomen, which they then cleanse, washing it thoroughly with palm wine, and again frequently with an infusion of pounded aromatics…" -Greek historian Herodotus describes the process of mummification in Egypt (trans. Rawlinson).

Shown here is an extraordinarily well preserved Egyptian mummy at the Louvre. This man lived during the Ptolemaic Period, and his name can be read as either Nenu or Pachery. The body has been sophisticatedly wrapped in strips of linen, and the mummy is covered with a cartonnage. Included here is a mask, an apron across the legs, and a collar over the chest.

Rigault Patricia from the Louvre provides the below description. This is only a section of the full write-up, you can read the rest here if you wish.

A body preserved for eternity

Not everyone in ancient Egypt had access to the funerary practices that ensured eternal life, and many people had to settle for a simple pit in the desert and a few modest offerings. For the more fortunate, preserving body provided an additional guarantee of survival in the afterlife. It offered a new support for the various elements of the living being that were dispersed at the time of death. Although the earliest mummies were little more than bodies wrapped in linen strips dipped in resin, more sophisticated methods soon developed; mummification procedures were highly perfected by the New Kingdom.

Although the number of mummies increased from this period on, the quality of the work tended to decrease. Nevertheless, mummies from the Greco-Roman period are often remarkable for the highly subtle designs formed by the interwoven linen strips. Depending on the period, a mummy could be covered a clothing, a net of beads, a mask, or a decorated wooden plank or cartonnage. During the Ptolemaic Period, various cartonnage elements were arranged on the mummy before it was placed in the coffin. 

Courtesy of & currently at the Louvre, France, N 2627. Photos by: Massimo Palmieri (1), Yann Caradec (2 & 3, cropped), and Oleg Ы (4).

archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey
Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.
Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey

Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.

Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

(via c-aesarion)

Book Roundup: Women in Antiquity

These are a selection of source books and scholarly works on the fascinating (and often overlooked) subject of women in antiquity:

Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity, by Sarah B. Pomeroy, an essential study of the lives of women in Greece and Rome. “The first treatment to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism.” — Mary Beard

Women in Classical World: Image and Text, by Elaine Fantham, Helene Peet Foley, Natalie Boymel Kampen, Sarah B. Pomeroy, H. A. Shapiro, “The first book on classical women to give equal weight to written texts and artistic representations, it brings together a great wealth of materials—poetry, vase painting, legislation, medical treatises, architecture, religious and funerary art, women’s ornaments, historical epics, political speeches, even ancient coins—to present women in the historical and cultural context of their time.”

The Sacred and the Feminine in Ancient Greece, by Sue Blundell, Margaret Williamson, a collection of essays exploring the intersection between women and religion in Ancient Greece.

Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Egypt, by Joyce A. Tyldesley, an extremely readable overview of the lives of women in ancient Egypt.

The Woman and the Lyre: Women Writers and Classical Greece and Rome, by Jane McIntosh Synder, "The pages of Snyder’s text are filled with stirring revelations about women’s achievements."—Susan C. Jarratt, Composition Chronicle

All titles link to the book’s Amazon page.

hismarmorealcalm:

Statue of Sekhmet  Temple of Mut  Luxor  Egypt  Unknown photographer

hismarmorealcalm:

Statue of Sekhmet  Temple of Mut  Luxor  Egypt  Unknown photographer

minoancorner:

Lilly fresco.  1500 BC. Found in "House of the Lilies" at Amniso, Crete. 
Currently in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum.
(x)

minoancorner:

Lilly fresco. 1500 BC. Found in "House of the Lilies" at Amniso, Crete.

Currently in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum.

(x)

(via mythologer)

Necklace with gold beads in the shape of double figure-of-eight shields, spiral gold beads and cornelian beads.
Cypriot artwork with Mycenaean inspiration, ca. 1400-1200 BC. From Enkomi
The British Museum

Necklace with gold beads in the shape of double figure-of-eight shields, spiral gold beads and cornelian beads.

Cypriot artwork with Mycenaean inspiration, ca. 1400-1200 BC. From Enkomi

The British Museum

Mummy Portrait: Woman with Necklace
(161 AD - 192 AD)
Encaustic on Wood
Found 1887 in Er-Rubaiyat, Egypt
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

Mummy Portrait: Woman with Necklace

(161 AD - 192 AD)

Encaustic on Wood

Found 1887 in Er-Rubaiyat, Egypt

Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

hismarmorealcalm:

Marble head of a woman 1st century A.D. Roman

Copy of a Hellenistic statue of the 3rd or 2nd century B.C.Coiffures with corkscrew curls were fashionable in Egypt and Cyrene during the Ptolemaic period. This head must have represented an important person, as several other copies are known today.
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

hismarmorealcalm:

Marble head of a woman 1st century A.D. Roman

Copy of a Hellenistic statue of the 3rd or 2nd century B.C.

Coiffures with corkscrew curls were fashionable in Egypt and Cyrene during the Ptolemaic period. This head must have represented an important person, as several other copies are known today.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(via thebacchant)